Hoi An among world's 10 most ideal car-free destinations: NatGeo

Created 02 June 2022
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U.S. magazine National Geographic has recommended Hoi An ancient town in central Vietnam among the world's 10 car-free tourist destinations ideal for Americans to visit this summer.

Hoi An among world's 10 most ideal car-free destinations: NatGeo

"Hoi An, a UNESCO heritage site, features 1,000 buildings dating from the 15th through 19th centuries, including shophouses and pagodas," NatGeo stated.

The American magazine advised tourists to take a boat tour along the iconic Hoai River or experience basket boat rides, attend cooking classes, or visit one of Hoi An's legendary tailors who can whip up a custom dress or suit in 48 hours.

Banh mi (Vietnamese sandwich) filled with delicious meat, pat, homemade sauces, hot peppers, herbs and pickled carrots is a must-try dish in Hoi An, NatGeo noted.

"Banh mi Phuong" is a culinary brand in the town that has been praised by bloggers and foreign media for several years now. Late blogger Anthony Bourdain once referred to the banh mi here as "the world's best."

Since 2004, the ancient town has pioneered pedestrian-friendly streets.

Motorbikes and cars are banned from the town center for large parts of the day – from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.

The NatGeo list also included Denmark's Tunø, the U.S.'s Channel Islands, Spain's Pontevedra old town and Australia's Rottnest Island.

 

Source: VNE

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